The 12 Disciples as Enneagram Numbers

I’m going to admit something I’m embarrassed of.

I enjoy the enneagram. Yes, I like to poke fun at it. I also think I’m too unique to let a personality test define me. But isn’t that just my inner 4 coming out?

If you aren’t familiar with the enneagram, it’s a personality test that helps you learn more about yourself and how to interact with others. While I don’t put a lot of stakes in personality tests, the Enneagram can be helpful.

Let’s have some fun and break down the disciples by their enneagram type. Of course this isn’t a very serious list, some of these are definitely a stretch, but I do hope it encourages you to learn more about the disciples.

Type 1 | The “Reformer” | Matthew

Ones lead through order and reason, but also are challenged by perfectionism and resentment.

Before he became a disciple, Matthew spent his professional life as a tax collector. Like most successful people in the financial sector, organization and perfectionism are important. I can only assume Matthew was also a one. 

Type 2  | The “Helper” | Andrew

Twos shine with generosity and are helpful, nurturing, and caring towards others but they also struggle with defending their own boundaries and people-pleasing.

We may not know a lot about Andrew, but we do know he was the first disciple to be called by Jesus. He was also responsible for leading his brother Simon Peter to Jesus.

We can see Andrew cared deeply about people. In the story where Jesus fed the multitudes, like any good two, he spoke up and and wanted to help.

Then Andrew, Simon Peter’s brother, spoke up. “There’s a young boy here with five barley loaves and two fish. But what good is that with this huge crowd?” “Tell everyone to sit down,” Jesus said. So they all sat down on the grassy slopes. – John 6:8

Type 3 | The “Performer” | Judas

Threes can be inspiring examples of excellence and authenticity, but also blindly pursue success and status.

I do apologize to all the threes out there. I promise I’m not calling you a Judas. But hear me out. Judas Iscariot had a lot of three characteristics…especially the negative ones.

Judas’ blind pursuit of greed and status is a clear indicator he’s a three.

Type 4 | The “Individualist” | Thaddeus

Fours can open people’s eyes to the beauty of the world and shine with authenticity, but also be held back by moodiness and self-absorption.

I’m going to be honest, this one is a stretch. But as a Four myself, I think it works. We don’t know much about Thaddeus, and I like to think as a four he’d like that. 

Fun fact, Thaddeus also had three different names in the Bible: Thaddeus, Judas, and Jude. What a 4! One name isn’t good enough.

Type 5  | The “Investigator” | Bartholomew

Fives are alert, insightful, and curious. They can demonstrate visionary intellect and inventiveness or become increasingly socially withdrawn and secretive.

When Bartholomew, also known as Nathaniel, was first told about Jesus, he was curious. “Can anything good come from Nazareth?” He questioned.

“Come and see,” said Philip. Like any five, Bartholomew’s curiosity got the best of him and he did go and see. He soon quickly became a disciple of Christ.

Type 6 | The “Loyalist” | Thomas

Sixes can exemplify courage and commitment, but also struggle with anxiety and rebelliousness, and are suspicious.

Thomas has all of the attributes of a six. In John 11, when Thomas received word his friend Lazarus died, he jumped up and explained “Let us also go, that we may die with him.” Talk about a committed friend. Sixes are loyal, committed and courageous.

After Jesus was crucified, Thomas struggled. Even when his friends told him Jesus was actually alive, he was suspicious and refused to believe it until he saw the scars in Jesus’ hands himself.

Type 7 | The “Enthusiast” | Simon Peter, James, Simon

Sevens can become uplifting visionaries and agents for positive change or struggle with impulsiveness and impatience.

Simon Peter, James, and Simon are all sevens. When Peter denies knowing Jesus, we see his impulsiveness and impatience come out.

James, along with Simon Peter and John, was one of Jesus’ closest disciples. Like Simon Peter, he was impulsive and impatient. When a  village rejected Jesus, James was ready to call down fire and brimstone to devour the entire place. Yikes. Now that’s impulsive.

Simon was a zealot. Zealots were a political party of revolutionists who were fiery and angry. But Simon was also fiercely loyal to his messiah.

Type 8  | The “Challenger” | John

Eights can be powerful, selfless leaders, but also control and intimidate others.

John was known as the “Son of Thunder.” Like his brother James, he was rash and very outspoken. I can imagine his temperament intimidated a lot of people.

Type 9 | The “Peacemaker” | Philip

Nines can bring people together and heal conflicts or be held back by passivity and stubbornness.

Philip wanted to bring people together and tell them about his Messiah. After following Jesus, Philip found Bartholomew and brought him into the fold of the disciples. A true Nine.

*Note: James the Lesser did not make this list, only because the Bible literally doesn’t tell us anything about his personality.

What disciple do you identify with most? Let me know in the comments below.

If You’re An Enneagram Fan This Song Will Make Your Day
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Beverly Farrell
Beverly Farrell
March 27, 2022 7:04 pm

This didn’t really surprise me, I’ve been called daughter of thunder in my days. I do love to lead and it comes naturally sometimes. But I’m also a real firm rule follower and can step on toes. Need to hone my grace and mercy skills

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